A Tale of Red Irish Ale

I had a recent chance to share some lovely Red Irish Ale with some of the people I work with in Hot Springs, Arkansas.  It was a wee draft, full of flavor and well balanced.  There were a lot of compliments on it, so I thought I would post a recipe for all you Irish beer brewers in the Ozarks.

 

IRISH RED ALE ALL GRAIN RECIPE

Type: All Grain Date: 9/2/2011
Batch Size: 5.00 gal Brewer: Ray Province & Bill Furnas
Boil Size: 5.49 gal Asst Brewer: Robin
Boil Time: 60 min Equipment: Cooler system
Taste Rating(out of 50): 45.0 Brewhouse Efficiency: 71.1
Taste Notes:

Ingredients

Amount Item Type % or IBU
9.00 lb Maris Otter (Crisp) (4.0 SRM) Grain 86.8 %
0.75 lb Barley, Flaked (Briess) (1.7 SRM) Grain 7.2 %
0.50 lb Crystal Dark – 77L (Crisp) (75.0 SRM) Grain 4.8 %
0.12 lb Chocolate (Crisp) (630.0 SRM) Grain 1.2 %
0.50 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00%] (5 min) (Aroma Hop-Steep) Hops
1.00 oz Goldings, East Kent [5.00%] (60 min) Hops 15.4 IBU
0.91 tsp Irish Moss (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs Irish Ale (White Labs #WLP004) Yeast-Ale

Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.055 SG Measured Original Gravity: 1.054 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.015 SG Measured Final Gravity: 1.010 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 5.2 % Actual Alcohol by Vol: 5.7 %
Bitterness: 15.4 IBU Calories: 239 cal/pint
Est Color: 15.4 SRM Color:

Color

Mash Profile

Mash Name: Single Infusion, Full Body Total Grain Weight: 10.37 lb
Sparge Water: 2.29 gal Grain Temperature: 60.0 F
Sparge Temperature: 168.0 F TunTemperature: 60.0 F
Adjust Temp for Equipment: FALSE Mash PH: 5.4 PH
Name Description Step Temp Step Time
Mash In Add 13.43 qt of water at 171.8 F 158.0 F 45 min
Mash Out Add 5.37 qt of water at 196.5 F 168.0 F 10 min
Mash Notes: Simple single infusion mash for use with most modern well modified grains (about 95% of the time).

Carbonation and Storage

Carbonation Type: Corn Sugar Volumes of CO2: 2.4
Pressure/Weight: 4.1 oz Carbonation Used: -1/2 cup
Keg/Bottling Temperature: 68.0 F Age for: 28.0 days
Storage Temperature: 68.0 F
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