A Celtic Ozark Summer Salad

It is too dang hot to cook in the Ozarks! So, a celtic ozark summer salad may just be the thing to put on the table. It is a fine old Celtic Ozark tradition for this time of year, when it gets hot, and the sun ripened tomatoes are in. I have written the recipe intentionally with minimal measurements. Just add and adjust according to what you have on hand and in the garden. This recipe will tolerate a lot of tinkering!

 

Becky Allen Celtic Ozark Summer Tomato Salad

 

1 package of mozzarella pearls

Tomatoes

Onion

Dressing

Herbs (Use your Celtic Ozark rosemary, mountain thyme, oregano, and parsley).

We like a little Greek Seasoning in it also.

Okay here is what I do; I chop up some tomatoes about the size of the mozzarella pearls. I have used grape tomatoes, roma, beefsteak, yellow heirlooms, what ever is on hand or looks good. And I gauge it to how many people I am feeding. I don’t like this salad the next day; I like my ‘maters crisp, not soggy.

 

Dice up some onion, just enough for a little flavour, I have used green onions, white, yellow and Vidalia. I like the pieces small unless I am using green onion.

 

My family likes Italian dressing, but balsamic vinaigrette is great on this too. I like just enough dressing to just lightly flavour the salad. However, my family likes this with a pretty good dousing.

 

I love a bit of basil and a touch of thyme in the salad. I have also used an Italian herb blend. Just a little dab will do.

 

You put this all in a bowl and then add the pearls until the salad is a pretty blend. The last time I made this I used about 4 lbs of tomatoes and ¾ of a bag of mozzarella pearls.

 

Now for the miscellaneous additions- you can serve the salad as is, which I frequently do. You can also add green and or yellow peppers, zucchini, summer squash; almost any veggie you like raw can go in here. Play around with this recipe a bit. It is great with grilled burger. I also like it on a bed of lettuce. Have fun and stay cool!!!

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